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Selected Portfolio

Remote Return // 2020 // Watercolor, gouache, colored pencil // 26” x 17”

Torn off of a roll of Arches cold press watercolor paper and rolled into my bike pannier, "Remote Return" began as a loose landscape painting I worked on during my bike rides up City Creek Canyon in Salt Lake City. I'd lay the painting on the ground and stabilize it with loose rocks. I wasn't liking the painting and stopped working on it. I began to use it as a test sheet for other paintings. Bordering the landscape are aspects of these paintings, as though one is looking at a memory through a window made of more recent memories. I returned to and finished the painting in July 2020. I see the act of finishing the piece similar to looking through a photo album: revisiting and re-examining past personas and finding beauty in the mundane. This painting received a Jurors' Award in the Utah Statewide Annual art exhibition in late 2020.


 

Fish in a Paradigm Shift // 2020 // Watercolor, gouache, colored pencil // 24” x 18”

Created during a time ripe for personal mythology: sheltering in place due to the Covid-19 pandemic and following the 5.7 magnitude earthquake in Magna, Utah on March 18, 2020. Reality felt as though it had been shattered and recreated. This piece was finished following further shaking of prevalent global perspectives on racism and socialization, making recent memories of reality feel antiquated. The pandemic and earthquake primed us to think more communally--those events enabled us to let old selves die and enter the void to see what might be on the other side.




Ecological Memory Map // 2020 // Watercolor, gouache, colored pencil // 45” x 34”

Created during my artist residency at the Natural History Museum of Utah, parallel to their exhibit, "Nature All Around Us," which was about urban nature. I worked on this painting in the main hall of the Natural History Museum while interacting with patrons. I had community art supplies on the table next to me, where I invited patrons to create artwork about their urban wildlife counters.




Koi Pond Map // 2019 // Watercolor, gouache, colored pencil // 16” x 12”

The koi pond--in the center--is by the basketball courts at Liberty Park in Salt Lake City, Utah. The pond is often littered and has too much algae. Yet the koi and their universe maintain their magic. I often paint the koi en plein air. When I visit and when I think of the koi, I envision them swimming up into the sky and into the galaxy.




Ilse and Ehrhardt // 2019 // Watercolor, colored pencil // 17” x 12”

Portrait of my friend's newborn twins. Depicted are Isle and Ehrhardt floating above Dry Creek Canyon in Salt Lake City, Utah, where their father was walking when he received a phone call from their mother saying she was going into labor. As the phone call came in, the father bent down toward a glacier lily.




Waking Map // 2019 // Watercolor, gouache, colored pencil // 24” x 18”

From my exhibition, "Transcendence by Observation," which showed at the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art in the spring of 2019 at the culmination of my artist residency at the museum. Incorporating imagery from throughout the exhibition, "Waking Map" was placed at the entrance to the gallery space. Next to "Waking Map" were copies of a small zine titled "For Your Pocket: Transcendence by Observation Field Guide," which contained a short poem about self discovery through observation.




Understood by the Mama Fox // 2019 // Watercolor, gouache, colored pencil // 45” x 34”

From my exhibition, "Transcendence by Observation," at the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art. There was a period of time when I spent each day after work in the Salt Lake City Cemetery watching a mama fox and her pups. I was depressed and watching them cheered me. The mama fox never seemed to notice me, which I was glad for, because I didn't want to interfere. One day, the mama fox did notice me. She walked a semi-circle around me. I didn't want her to feel threatened, so I left. Before leaving, I took her photograph; I zoomed in with my a long zoom camera lens. Once home, I looked at the photograph. I saw understanding in the fox's face. From her gaze, I felt as she understood me better than I understood myself.




Grounded by the Rock with Wings // 2019 // Watercolor, gouache, colored pencil // 45” x 34”

From my exhibition, "Transcendence by Observation," at the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art. I visited Shiprock pinnacle in 2018. My boyfriend at the time suggested we visit it. Shiprock holds significance in Navajo mythology. I didn't anticipate its power. Shiprock is the real deal. I kept asking my boyfriend, "can you feel it?" I alternated between giggling and hugging myself, and falling to my knees almost sobbing.




Loved by the Prickly Pear // 2019 // Watercolor, gouache, colored pencil // 45” x 34”

From my exhibition, "Transcendence by Observation," at the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art. While hiking in City Creek Canyon in Salt Lake city, I found a prickly pear cactus with bright yellow flowers. There aren't many wild cacti in Northern Utah, so I was intrigued. I knelt down by the cactus and found a wasp nest nestled at the base of the cactus. The shape of the nest was like a clam or an open mouth. On the other side of the cactus I found aphid-looking-beetles. A few days later I returned with my paints and a large sheet of rolled up watercolor paper tied to my backpack. I unrolled the paper and on the ground and held it down with rocks and painted the cactus en plein air. I revisited the cactus several times. The yellow flowers fell and were replaced by prickly pear fruit. I picked and ate the fruit while visiting. I had needles all over my fingers, lips and legs. "Glochids" is what the dictionary called the tiny needles. As recommended by online tutorials, I rubbed the glochids off with pantyhose. 




Acknowledged by the Sunset at Horsethief // 2019 // Watercolor, gouache, colored pencil // 45” x 34”

From my exhibition, "Transcendence by Observation," at the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art. I visited the Moab area to perform research for a commission in the summer of 2018. My mom came with me. We camped outside under the stars. It was so hot, we both slept on top of our sleeping bags and drank instant coffee cold. One night we camped at Horsethief Campground. I walked away from camp to paint, read my book and finish my dinner. The sky eased out of virga and rainbows into a sunset. I found a raised platform. Standing on it made me feel as though I was within the sunset. I felt acknowledged and blessed by the sunset.




Sky Snakes C // 2018 // Linocut printed on a letterpress // 19” x 19”

From my exhibition, "Transcendence by Observation," at the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art. This linocut print is a visual expression of the feeling of release, flow and love, which one feels after coming out of a long existential crisis. This was printed from a single linoleum block. I created several compositions from that same block and have included two of the compositions in this portfolio.




Sky Snakes B // 2018 // Linocut printed on a letterpress // 22” x 10”

From my exhibition, "Transcendence by Observation," at the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art. This linocut print is a visual expression of the feeling of release, flow and love, which one feels after coming out of a long existential crisis. This was printed from a single linoleum block. I created several compositions from that same block and have included two of the compositions in this portfolio.




Cosmos 21 // 2018 // Linocut printed on a letterpress // 16” x 12”

From my exhibition, "Transcendence by Observation," at the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art. While my other work in the exhibition was largely representational with abstractions incorporated, these prints were a pure abstraction of the feelings the exhibition was mean to convey: a sense of transcendence and love coming from one's surroundings. I created 39 different versions of these Cosmos linocut prints and displayed a selection side by side to convey an evolution of thought. The full series have been combined to create a 16 second video. CLICK HERE to see the video.




Hidden Hollow // 2018 // Watercolor, gouache, colored pencil // 12” x 9”

One of the six illustrations I created for "Field Work Field Guide: Aligning Poetry & Science," which was a collaboration between the Natural History Museum of Utah, the Salt Lake City Public Library and former Utah poetry Laureate Katherine Coles. The field guide encouraged Salt Lake City residents to pay attention to and engage with outdoor natural spaces.




Salt Lake City Cemetery // 2018 // Watercolor, gouache, colored pencil // 12” x 9”

Work Field Guide: Aligning Poetry & Science," which was a collaboration between the Natural History Museum of Utah, the Salt Lake City Public Library and former Utah poetry Laureate Katherine Coles. The field guide encouraged Salt Lake City residents to pay attention to and engage with outdoor natural spaces.





The Inhabitants of the Salt Lake City Cemetery // 2016 // Inkjet prints of watercolor paintings, 3M 415 tape, linen thread // 10” x 7” when open

Hand-bound and sewn artist book of my essay, "The Inhabitants of the Salt Lake City Cemetery," which was part of my 2016 solo exhibition at the Marmalade Branch of the Salt Lake City Public Library. The cover is a scan of my watercolor painting, "The Magpies' Pink Cemetery Map," created in 2015. Excerpt from the text: "The most frequent sound in the Salt Lake City Cemetery is the call of magpies one to another. The magpies own the cemetery. Or at least the magpies act as though the cemetery belongs to them. If the magpies do think this, I don't mind. The cemetery certainly doesn't belong to me, even though I like to think that I belong when I'm in the cemetery."




Amy Irvine's Desert Cabal // 2018 // Watercolor // 16” x 10”

Ken Sanders Rare Books, Salt Lake City, and Back of Beyond Books, Moab, Utah, commissioned me to illustrate and design four broadsides celebrating the 50th anniversary of the publication of "Desert Solitaire: A Season in the Wilderness" by Edward Abbey. The broadsides featured quotes provided by four authors. I visited Moab and Arches National Park to research imagery for the broadsides. This broadside depicts two ravens I met outside of Devil's Garden and a quote by Amy Irvine. The editioned broadsides were digital reproductions. of my watercolor paintings, with letterpress printing by Tryst Press. The other authors included Wendell Berry, Doug Peacock and Terry Tempest Williams.




Snake Walk in Sunlight // 2017 // Linocut printed on the letterpress, watercolor, colored pencil, PVA // 24” x 20”

Linocut prints overlaid on watercolor and colored pencil. Created for a group exhibition titled "Walking | Mapping."




Dragon Bird Brain // 2017 // Linocut, watercolor, gel pen, rice paste // 16” x 12”

Created for a group exhibition titled "Walking | Mapping." The base of the image was printed from the same linocut as the "Cosmos" prints. My statement for the piece reads: Here we go 'round again. Transition into twenty ten... plus seven. Shed your dead skin like a snakeskin. Follow your own spoor into this brave new dimension and grow some wings if you like. Perhaps fashion them after a magpie. Or a dragonfly. Or be like this dragon-snake and form your wings after both a magpie and a dragonfly. "Gossamer wings" is how my friend Yukio once described the wings shed by a deceased dragonfly in a haiku he wrote and sent me before a morning hike. I read the haiku prior to his handing the glassy wings to me, which I then wrapped in a Kroger Home Sense tissue, tucked them into my pannier and bicycled home. The "gossamer" dragonfly wings paired with magpie wings were the blueprint for the wings on this snake.




Now I Shed Some Skin // 2017 // Inkjet prints of watercolor paintings, 3M 415 tape, linen thread, rice paste // 17” x 8” when open

Hand-bound and sewn artist book containing the first chapter of "All of Us Beasts," the book I wrote and illustrated for my Environmental Humanities master's project. On the front cover a snake pops-up revealing another snake beneath. The text block contains paper rocks, which also pop-up. The reader can lift each rock to view the section heading. The text begins, "Let us be clear: I am addressing you, dear reader. I am addressing you as if you were a snake."